Partaking of Wyoming’s sedimentary strata

Wyoming sedimentary strataYesterday, a surprising end to an interview with the University of Wyoming videographer Ali Grossman.

While packing her gear, she pulled me aside: “There are some fabulous rock formations south of town that I know you’d like. I’d be happy to take you. Are you interested?”

Omigosh, are you kidding, when? “What about tonight after you’re finished at the musem?”

We headed out early evening, packed with cameras, just as shadows began to overlay the range. Our destination was the middle of nowhere, black angus and antelope the only signs of life.

On my own, I would have never found this pocket of rocks wedged between Laramie and Medicine Bow Peak. Most locals don’t know about the place. Aly had only discovered it recently, after living in Laramie for more than ten years.

This geologic treasure is not marked on any map that I could find. I scraped Google raw tonight looking for data—something, anything, but nothing turned up. Sandstone, siltstone, shale—as best as I can tell. Sedimentary swirls, looking very much like patterns of sand on a beach.

But then, I don’t need to know more than what I saw of this sculptural oasis to savor the memory—the deep, sublime ache of its shadowy beauty.

Laramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock Forms
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Laramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock FormsLaramie Rock Forms

Laramie Rock Forms, a set on Flickr.